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Everyone with celiac disease is gluten sensitive, but not everyone with gluten sensitivity will develop celiac disease.

When Your Body Goes Against the Grain: Celiac Disease & Gluten Sensitivity

How did gluten, a naturally-occurring protein found in wheat, barley and rye - sources of nutrition for people over thousands of years, become so unhealthy?

Many scientists attribute the increase in Celiac Disease (CD) and non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (GS) to alternations in wheat's biological structure, the result of modern farming and bread-making practices and the chemicals used today. The result: wheat crops that are biochemically different from the virgin wheat of agrarian society. Because our bodies have not adapted to these chemically treated crops, we're unable to digest them properly.

Modern bread-making has gone from being a simple four-ingredient wholesome loaf of sustenance to being a less-nutrient dense squishy loaf of preservatives. Old-fashioned baking involved giving flour time to absorb as much water as possible, and waiting for yeast and bacteria to activate the dough (fermentation). Today, industrialized baking replaces natural hydration, fermentation and kneading with artificial additives and massive mixers to accelerate dough formation. To endure commercial processing and increase shelf life, additional concentrated vital wheat gluten and preservatives are stuffed into bread products.

Celiac Disease

One in 133 adults and children have CD, a genetic, autoimmune disorder that occurs in response to ingesting gluten, triggering the immune system to attack the delicate lining of the small intestine. This creates inflammation and can lead to nutrient malabsorption and secondary health problems. There are over 200 symptoms for CD, including:

  • extreme abdominal pain
  • nausea, vomiting
  • gas, constipation, diarrhea
  • joint pain, anemia, fatigue
  • stunted growth, skin rashes
  • behavior disorders, mood disturbances

Symptoms can begin immediately and last from a few hours to several days. The primary treatment for CD is a life-long gluten-free diet.

Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity (Gluten Intolerance)

Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity (GS) affects 6-7% of the U.S. population. It's an adverse food-induced reaction that seems to have an immune component. Gluten activates an inflammatory response that can affect tissues anywhere in the body. Symptoms vary based upon individual and environmental factors. Determining if you have GS requires testing to rule out CD. Blood/genetic tests are not available for directly assessing GS. Currently, holistic doctors use a Food Sensitivity Panel to identify reactions to wheat. Also, an elimination diet with symptom monitoring can assess GS.

Testing for CD

genetic test (Celiac HLA) indicates your risk for developing CD. If a first-degree family member has CD, a negative gene test excludes you from the possibility of developing it.

Blood tests require that you continue eating gluten products in order to get an accurate result. (Abstaining from gluten will skew the results.) Your practitioner will determine the amount of time required to eat gluten prior to testing. The tTg-IgA (Tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies) test looks for antibodies toward gluten. Your holistic physician may order a panel of antibody tests to assess if you are deficient in antibodies the body needs, or if the body is creating antibodies against its own tissues.

An endoscopic biopsy might be ordered to obtain a definitive diagnosis of CD. In this procedure, performed by an M.D. who specializes in digestive disorders, a part of the small intestine is removed and examined for damage.

Based on your symptoms and test results, your holistic physician can determine the type of testing you need and design an appropriate, personalized treatment plan.

References

Food for Thought. . .

"Calm mind brings inner strength and self-confidence, so that's very important for good health." - Dalai Lama

Delicious Gluten-Free Pasta – Finally!

Yes, it's true! Pasta made from lentils is one of the tastiest and most nutritious gluten-free options for many people. Typically made from red lentils, also known as pulses, lentil pasta is more than just naturally gluten-free … it's also

  • rich in dietary fiber (as much as 11 g per serving)
  • high in protein (between 14-21 g per 3 oz serving depending on brand)
  • a low-glycemic index food
  • cholesterol-free
  • a great source of calcium, potassium, zinc, and iron.

Lentil pastas are calorie dense (up to 100 calories per oz), so a little goes a long way toward filling your belly. For lunch or dinner, these pastas can be a great meatless meal accompanied by assorted veggies and topped with your choice of sauce or a vinaigrette.

When you cook lentil pasta, the water may appear cloudy. This is due to the starches cooking out of the legumes. Lentil pasta expands as it cooks: be sure to use a large pot with ample water as the water may foam (check instructions) and you want to give your noodles breathing room.

When choosing legume pasta, if affordable, opt for organic varieties. You also want to make sure the brand does not harvest from genetically modified crops (GMO crops), so look for the "NO_GMO" label on the package. Some brands to look for include Tolerant, Modern Table, Pow! And Explore Cuisine.

Bon Appétit!

References

Gluten-Free Zucchini Pasta Primavera

Primavera! That's Italian for "lightly sauteed springtime vegetables." Traditionally made with a not-so-light creamy cheese sauce, this recipe transforms the dish into a healthier and tastier version. A more delicate cream sauce is created from a base of cashew butter. The combination of Dijon, lemon, chicken broth, garlic and onions combine to yield an aromatic flavor that will delight everyone at your table.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh or frozen broccoli florets
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3/4 cup 1/4-inch-thick half-moon slices onion
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups 1/4-inch-thick sliced white mushrooms
  • 1 cup 1/4-inch-thick sliced carrots
  • 1 cup 1/4-inch-thick sliced red bell peppers
  • 1 cup unsalted chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons cashew butter
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 package of lentil pasta cooked according to package instructions*

Preparation

Bring a medium saucepan of water to a boil. Add the broccoli and cook until bright green, tender-crisp and slightly undercooked, 2 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are soft, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms, carrots and peppers, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the carrots are fork tender, 10 to 12 minutes. Combine with the broccoli.

*Prepare the pasta in a separate pot

Bring the chicken broth to a boil in a medium saucepan; immediately reduce the heat to low and whisk in the cashew butter until the mixture is smooth. Stir in 1 teaspoon of the lemon juice and the mustard, and season with salt and pepper. Gently toss with the vegetables.

Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over high heat; add the zucchini and cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the remaining 1 teaspoon lemon juice and season with salt and pepper.

Serve the the pasta on plates or large bowls topped with veggies and sauce mixture.

*Do not prepare pasta too early or the noodles will have to sit, which can make them become mushy.

References

Gut Protection with L-Glutamine

When you have a digestive illness, it essentially means that your delicate intestinal lining (the mucosa) is damaged, making it impossible to extract nutrients and other substances crucial for your body's biological processes. The amino acid L-Glutamine is one of these substances. A protein building block, L-Glutamine is stored in muscle where it's vital to tissue growth and repair. It's involved in the formation of other amino acids and glucose (sugar), as well as the body's adaptive response to stress and the optimal functioning of the immune and digestive systems.

The mucosa requires maintenance to protect and repair itself from the effects of stress, toxins, and a poor diet. When the mucosa breaks down, inflammation results and this is associated with a variety of chronic health conditions. Further, when illness, chronic or severe stress, inflammation, or food sensitivity/allergies cause the gut to fail at effectively breaking down food to acquire nutrients, deficiency results. A lack of sufficient glutamine in the gut creates a cycle of wear and tear on the mucosa.

Clinical research shows that L-Glutamine supplements can break that cycle by helping repair damage and potentially help the lining regrow. This connection between glutamine and intestinal maintenance has led researchers to examine its role in Celiac Disease and gluten sensitivity.

L-Glutamine supplements are available in both pill and powder form. Proper dose is crucial to its effectiveness. It's not recommended for children under age 10 or for people with certain health conditions, including kidney or liver disease. Consult with a holistic health practitioner to find out if L-Glutamine is right for you.

References

Heal Thy Gut with Marshmallow Root

There's much more to that sweet, fluffy treat we enjoy melted in a s'more or sprinkled atop hot cocoa. Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) is an ancient herb whose Greek name, Althainean, means "to heal." Ancient Greek and Egyptian healers used Marshmallow flowers and leaves in salads to support healthy digestion. A secretion, known as mucilage, from its roots and stems, was used to soften the skin, treat sore throats, and ease congestion. Modern holistic practitioners use Marshmallow Root (aka "mallow") for these purposes and in treatment preparations for:

  • inflammation of the lining of the stomach
  • digestive issues including diarrhea stomach ulcers, constipation
  • inflammatory bowel disease, leaky gut syndrome and autoimmune disorders
  • skin conditions such as eczema
  • bloating and water retention
  • dry coughs and colds
  • bacterial infections and respiratory infections

A key healing property of Marshmallow Root is the ability to soothe inflammation of the mucous membranes throughout the body. When food sensitivity/allergies, illness, or other factors interfere with healthy digestion, a person can experience upset stomach, heartburn, constipation or diarrhea. Mallow forms a thick protective coating in the digestive tract, which helps reduce the burning and tame other symptoms of digestive distress.

With tall stalks topped by a lovely five-petal white blossom with purple center, Marshmallow Root makes a striking addition to a garden - especially if you enjoy harvesting for herbal tea. Supplements come in different forms including powder, tea, extract, ointments, and capsule. While considered safe for most adults and children, do ask your holistic practitioner which preparations of are best for you.

References

Tips & Tools for Easy, Delicious Gluten-Free Living

Today's options for a gluten-free lifestyle are better than ever. You still want your food choices to be wholesome, organic, and fresh so remember: Just because a product carries the GF food logo, doesn't mean it's healthy. Read ingredients and watch out for high sugar content and processed ingredients.

We hope this list of resources helps you make gluten-free living easy and delicious.

Apps. Use apps to help you buy groceries, find a restaurant, view a GF menu, or verify allergen content. There's even an app to help you translate dietary preferences into another language!

Grocery:

Restaurants:

Check-out Healthline's Best Gluten Free Living Apps of the 2017

Websites.

Celiac Disease Foundation: education, resources and support for those living with CD. Learn how to live GF, monitor symptoms; explore the GF marketplace – packed with recipes, news, and tips.

Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG): industry leader in the certification of gluten-free products and food services. Provides support, advocacy and education resources. You can join a local branch, research products and restaurants, browse recipes, and find helpful tips for kids and families. Offers an e-magazine.

Beyond Celiac: awareness and advocacy organization, covering research, news, events, lifestyle and dietary support.

Gluten-Free Living: one of the longest running publications and websites on gluten-free diet and lifestyle.

Elana's Pantry: one of the longest running websites dedicated to great tasting GF and allergen-free recipes. Elana walks her talk and has overcome challenging medical diagnoses through wholesome living and dietary solutions.

Glutenista: hip, fun GF lifestyle brand providing resources, tips, and fashion for your wardrobe and kitchen.

Find healthy GF recipes and tips by visiting the website for your favorite GF brands (e.g., Udi, Smart Flour Foods, Bob's Red Mill, and Canyon BakeHouse to name just a few). Google "gluten free food companies" to find brands and food services including those in your local area.

Guiding Principles



The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.

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